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The Ethics of AuthorshipCommunication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard$
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Daniel Berthold

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233946

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823233946.001.0001

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6. A Penchant For Disguise: The Death (and Rebirth) of the Author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche

6. A Penchant For Disguise: The Death (and Rebirth) of the Author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche

Chapter:
(p.128) 6. A Penchant For Disguise: The Death (and Rebirth) of the Author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche
Source:
The Ethics of Authorship
Author(s):

Daniel Berthold

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823233946.003.0007

This chapter situates Kierkegaard's commitment to death in companionship with a similar, if not identical, commitment on the part of Friedrich Nietzsche. Both conceptualize the relation between self and other as occurring across an abyss of difference that dissolves the authority of the author, and adhere to a philosophy of language in which the author's text becomes infinitely interpretable according to the position occupied by the reader. But notwithstanding the inventiveness with which Kierkegaard and Nietzsche practice the art of dying, we can discern a fundamental ambivalence: With every intention of dying, they have recurring second thoughts; at the entrance to the tomb they hesitate, giving in to a certain nostalgia for the privileged position of the author.

Keywords:   Søren Kierkegaard, Friedrich Nietzsche, death, authorship

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