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Apophatic BodiesNegative Theology, Incarnation, and Relationality$
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Chris Boesel and Catherine Keller

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780823230815

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823230815.001.0001

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“Being Neither Oneself Nor Someone Else”: The Apophatic Anthropology of Dionysius the Areopagite*

“Being Neither Oneself Nor Someone Else”: The Apophatic Anthropology of Dionysius the Areopagite*

Chapter:
(p.59) “Being Neither Oneself Nor Someone Else”: The Apophatic Anthropology of Dionysius the Areopagite*
Source:
Apophatic Bodies
Author(s):

Charles M. Stang

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823230815.003.0004

This chapter traces Saint Paul's influence on Dionysius the Areopagite's “apophatic anthropology” and Christology. It offers a brief review of the Dionysian universe, giving special attention to the themes of body and creation, as well as the question of Paul's influence on Dionysius' “apophatic anthropology” and his corresponding Christology. It also argues that writing under a pseudonym is integral to the aims of the corpus. Finally, the chapter ponders whether and how this practice of writing stands outside the purview of the celestial and ecclesiastical hierarchies and thereby leaves open the possibility that one might access deifying union with the unknown God in ways other than those permitted by the hierarchies.

Keywords:   Saint Paul, Dionysius the Areopagite, apophatic anthropology, Christology, God, hierarchies, pseudonym

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