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Apophatic BodiesNegative Theology, Incarnation, and Relationality$
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Chris Boesel and Catherine Keller

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780823230815

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823230815.001.0001

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The Infinite Found in Human Form: Intertwinings of Cosmology and Incarnation*

The Infinite Found in Human Form: Intertwinings of Cosmology and Incarnation*

Chapter:
(p.286) The Infinite Found in Human Form: Intertwinings of Cosmology and Incarnation*
Source:
Apophatic Bodies
Author(s):

Philip Clayton

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823230815.003.0014

The Infinite is never just “found” in human form, standing before us waiting to be grasped. The language may be kataphatic, but it does not therefore “possess” God in objective form. The two theological loci mentioned here are indeed “intertwined”. In the end, however, incarnation trumps and limits cosmology. Theological cosmology, if there is to be one, can only be incarnational cosmology, a kenotic doctrine of creation. This chapter claims that the theology of incarnation grows out of the practice of imitatio Christi; these two sides then together constrain what the theologian may say about creation. If this is right, even the divine act of creation (and consequently, of course, the human one) must be seen as a voluntary self-limitation, mirroring the work of the one who “being found in human form … humbled himself”.

Keywords:   infinite, human form, God, incarnation, cosmology, creation, theology

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