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Without Nature?A New Condition for Theology$
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David Albertson and Cabell King

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780823230693

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823230693.001.0001

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Nature, Change, and Justice

Nature, Change, and Justice

Chapter:
(p.282) Nature, Change, and Justice
Source:
Without Nature?
Author(s):

Lisa Sowle Cahill

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823230693.003.0013

This chapter proposes that nature is “polyvalent,” particularly as it simultaneously delineates that which is and that which ought to be. Nature designates not only physical structures but also social and psychological structures. Rather than depend on the fixity of human nature, the chapter insists on the possible sanctification of nature, an ethical hope that human natures can grow collectively more just. Theology's new condition is not being without nature but appropriating our moral nature in interdependence with a global community. Situating ourselves in relation to the world community and understanding the self in that social and political context suggests that the proper—even “natural”—human function is an ethic of care for those who are disadvantaged.

Keywords:   nature, human nature, moral nature, self

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