Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Church and SocietyThe Laurence J. McGinley Lectures, 1988-2007$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Avery Cardinal Dulles

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780823228621

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823228621.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2019

Priesthood and Gender

Priesthood and Gender

April 10, 1996

Chapter:
(p.205) 15 Priesthood and Gender
Source:
Church and Society
Author(s):

Avery Cardinal Dulles

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823228621.003.0015

The most controversial statement that came from the Holy See during the pontificate of John Paul II concerned the priestly ordination of women. This chapter takes a look at this question of woman's ordination, examining the arguments in the Bible, tradition, theological reasoning, and magisterial authority. The biblical component argues that Christ and his apostles selected only men as members. The argument from tradition is that the Catholic bishops have always observed the norm of conferring sacred orders only on men, whereas sects that ordained women to the priesthood were denounced as heretical. The theological reasoning is to the effect that the ministerial priest shares in a representative way in the office of Christ as Bridegroom of the Church, and must therefore be, like Christ, of the male sex. The teaching of the magisterium is unwavering in holding that the ministerial priesthood cannot be exercised by women.

Keywords:   women's ordination, Bible, tradition, theological reasoning, magisterial authority, Christ

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .