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Toward a Theology of ErosTransfiguring Passion at the Limits of Discipline$
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Virginia Burrus and Catherine Keller

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780823226351

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823226351.001.0001

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“She Talks Too Much”: Magdalene Meditations

“She Talks Too Much”: Magdalene Meditations

Chapter:
(p.234) “She Talks Too Much”: Magdalene Meditations
Source:
Toward a Theology of Eros
Author(s):

Catherine Keller

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823226351.003.0013

The icon of Mary Magdalene flashes through popular culture, but with a curious difference now. The saint has found her voice. While the recently resurrected Jesus is lecturing on the mysteries of Sophia, divine Wisdom, in her struggle with the primal chaos, tension erupts between Mariam, the Magdalene, and the apostle Peter, who accuses her of “talking too much”. This incident encodes a churning set of inassimilable tensions within early Christianity, exposing bifurcations of hermeneutics and ecclesiology within an already highly differentiated tradition, of gender within a destabilized patriarchy, of sexuality along a spectrum of carnal and spiritual eros, and of the binding of these differences into the binary of orthodoxy and heresy. This chapter surfaces the productively disruptive potentiality mobilized within historically layered and highly eroticized representations of the parabiblical figure of Mary Magdalene. It ultimately invokes process theology, post-structuralist philosophy, and contemporary physics to point toward a new theological cosmology in which the pleromatic is transfigured as the khoric site of divine becoming and erotic creativity.

Keywords:   Mary Magdalene, gender, patriarchy, sexuality, eros, process theology, contemporary physics, theological cosmology, erotic creativity

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