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Crossover QueriesDwelling with Negatives, Embodying Philosophy's Others$
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Edith Wyschogrod

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823226061

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823226061.001.0001

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Heterological History

Heterological History

A Conversation

Chapter:
(p.316) 20 Heterological History
Source:
Crossover Queries
Author(s):

Edith Wyschogrod

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823226061.003.0021

In The Ethics of Remembering, Edith Wyschogrod applies the familiar postmodernist concept of “heterology”—the study of otherness or “alterity”—to the philosophy of history. This chapter presents her conversation with Carl Raschke, in which they explore the notion of “heterological history” in relationship to a variety of contemporary philosophical and theological themes. Two directions occur to Wyschogrod. First, there is the character of the past itself. Wyschogrod claims that the past is “an unsurpassable negation” that can never be brought back materially, so that there is an apophasis belonging to the past that cannot be overcome. Yet second, the past is transmitted via language and image. So the past is a secret in the Derridean sense. However, this secret begs to be revealed.

Keywords:   Edith Wyschogrod, otherness, alterity, philosophy of history, Carl Raschke, heterological history, past, negation, apophasis

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