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After GodRichard Kearney and the Religious Turn in Continental Philosophy$
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John Panteleimon Manoussakis

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780823225316

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823225316.001.0001

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On the God of the Possible

On the God of the Possible

Chapter:
(p.167) On the God of the Possible
Source:
After God
Author(s):

Stanislas Breton

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823225316.003.0012

This chapter examines the senses of the possible arising from Kearney's conception of the divine. In the first place, it suggests the lightness of taking wing or exceeding the speed limit, so as to leave behind both the finished matters of the past and the actuality of the present. A second path of thought is suggested if one takes the possible in the adverbial form of the perhaps. This rules out the sense of the possible with which Kearney is not concerned such as in logic — the possible figures among the modalities, under two forms: “possibly the case” and “possibly not”. The discussion notes that the God of the possible, the God who may be, is not very distant from the God of the Cross. In both discourses, “God depends on us”, and it is one's responsibility that is engaged in the transfiguration of the world.

Keywords:   logic, divine, Richard Kearney, God, Cross, possible

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