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HeideggerThrough Phenomenology to Thought$
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William J. Richardson

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780823222551

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823222551.001.0001

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What E-Vokes Thought?

What E-Vokes Thought?

Chapter:
(p.595) Chapter XIX What E-Vokes Thought?
Source:
Heidegger
Author(s):

William J. Richardson

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823222551.003.0035

This chapter examines Heidegger's first post-war lecture course of “What E-vokes Thought?”. Stretched over two semesters, the theme is developed in two different ways. In the winter semester, Heidegger's purpose was to approach the problem in terms of the philosophical tradition. With Nietzsche as his dialogue partner in learning, it is here that the author elaborates the Zarathustra analysis as signifying the correlation between Being and man. In the summer semester, he devotes himself to an exposition of his own composition of thought, developed through dialogue with the pre-Socratics. This chapter argues that it is Being that e-vokes thought as it is the process by which all beings emerge into presence. In order for the process to take place, there is a need for a There among beings. This want of a There is already an e-vocation of thought conceived as a fundamental structure.

Keywords:   winter semester, summer semester, Zarathustra, Nietzsche, pre-Socratics, e-voking

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