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The Anthropological TurnThe Human Orientation of Karl Rahner$
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Anton Losinger

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780823220663

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823220663.001.0001

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Excursus: on the Relation of Philosophy and Theology Against the Backdrop of “Transcendental Revelation”

Excursus: on the Relation of Philosophy and Theology Against the Backdrop of “Transcendental Revelation”

Chapter:
(p.85) Excursus: on the Relation of Philosophy and Theology Against the Backdrop of “Transcendental Revelation”
Source:
The Anthropological Turn
Author(s):

Anton Losinger

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823220663.003.0004

Although theology and philosophy have remarkable differences, Rahner was able to establish a relationship between the two. Historically speaking and according to the Scriptures, God regards humans as the stewards of His creation; likewise, He views human beings as responsible creatures who will obey His commandments. It is implied here that humans were given the privilege to hear from God; thus, proving the existence of the creator. By virtue of this gift of communication, there lies on one hand, a “natural” process of following God's words and on the other hand, a chance of deciding for one's self depending on his/her experience and reasoning. Additionally, Rahner mentions that the importance of the “transcendentally-anthropological starting point” of theology is to draw affinity between the human experience of the self and the dogma.

Keywords:   theology, philosophy, human beings, God, existence, God's words, transcendentally-anthropological starting point, dogma

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