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The Anthropological TurnThe Human Orientation of Karl Rahner$
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Anton Losinger

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780823220663

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823220663.001.0001

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The Formal–Methodological Method of the Starting Point: Theology as Transcendental Reflection

The Formal–Methodological Method of the Starting Point: Theology as Transcendental Reflection

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 The Formal–Methodological Method of the Starting Point: Theology as Transcendental Reflection
Source:
The Anthropological Turn
Author(s):

Anton Losinger

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823220663.003.0003

Questions pertaining to transcendence started from the rise of philosophical thinking. With this, we can infer that philosophy is not separated from theology but rather it is the foundation of the ideas of theology. However, Rahner promotes the impression that the two are totally different subject areas due to the notion that whenever human beings think about their nature, all their thoughts are anchored from their theological state—principles, attitude, and devotion. That is to say, for an individual to acquire salvation, one has to work for it in an existential or methodological manner. Moreover, Rahner explains his justification on the possibility of metaphysical understanding of the transcendental knowledge as well as the means to harmonize transcendental knowledge and freedom to select what to store in one's mind.

Keywords:   transcendence, philosophy, theology, human beings, salvation, metaphysical understanding, existential, transcendental knowledge, freedom

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