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The Anthropological TurnThe Human Orientation of Karl Rahner$
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Anton Losinger

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780823220663

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823220663.001.0001

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The Content of the Starting Point: Theology as Anthropology

The Content of the Starting Point: Theology as Anthropology

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 The Content of the Starting Point: Theology as Anthropology
Source:
The Anthropological Turn
Author(s):

Anton Losinger

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823220663.003.0002

Human beings serve as the source of every theological inquiry for the reason that the human being is viewed as both person and subject. Only an individual's experience of one's self can result from that person's experience of God regardless of the recognition that God (i.e. His nature and existence) is unfathomable. Human being's spiritual character makes the physical body transcend, which implies that as the spirit continuously extends its limits in search of the absolute, it also sets the proof of God's existence. The subsistence of human beings, God's manifestation of Himself through the grace experienced by humans, and the “hypostatic union” in Christ's life are testimonies to the recognition of the reality of God and eternal life with Him.

Keywords:   human being, God, nature, existence, hypostatic union, Christ's life, eternal life

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