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XenocitizensIlliberal Ontologies in Nineteenth-Century America$
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Jason Berger

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9780823287758

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2021

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823287758.001.0001

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Agitating Margaret Fuller

Agitating Margaret Fuller

Chapter:
(p.58) Chapter 2 Agitating Margaret Fuller
Source:
Xenocitizens
Author(s):

Jason Berger

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823287758.003.0003

This chapter offers a competing portrait of Margaret Fuller’s brand of political citizenship. By examining Fuller’s earlier work, especially her writings about music, a new version of her political and social views becomes visible. The affective and formal elements of Fuller’s thought—where various sounds, tones, and pulsations explicitly and/or implicitly mediated her thinking about material reality—reveal a complex dialectic between the personal and the social. Going much further than merely revising the common historical narrative that sees Fuller moving from romantic to radical modes of thinking after her departure for Europe in 1846, the chapter portrays how Fuller develops a model of nineteenth-century political personhood that literary scholars and historians alike have yet to fully address.

Keywords:   drive, Margaret Fuller, music, nineteenth-century American literature, political radicalism, transcendentalism

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