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Religion, Emotion, SensationAffect Theories and Theologies$
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Karen Bray and Stephen D. Moore

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780823285679

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2020

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823285679.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

The “Unspeakable Teachings” of The Secret Gospel of Mark: Feelings and Fantasies in the Making of Christian Histories

The “Unspeakable Teachings” of The Secret Gospel of Mark: Feelings and Fantasies in the Making of Christian Histories

Chapter:
(p.145) The “Unspeakable Teachings” of The Secret Gospel of Mark: Feelings and Fantasies in the Making of Christian Histories
Source:
Religion, Emotion, Sensation
Author(s):

Alexis G. Waller

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823285679.003.0008

A fragmentary text exhumed from the archives in 1958—or else fabricated that same year—is the fraught subject of this essay. Secret Mark has been embraced as the earliest surviving version of the Gospel of Mark and denounced as either a second-century forgery or a twentieth-century hoax. The stormy reception history of this controversial text—one that appears to represent a homoerotic encounter between Jesus and an unnamed young man—is an affective history of the first order, as the essay demonstrates. Approaching the scholarly and popular reception of Secret Mark as a queer archive of feelings (a là Ann Cvetkovich), the essay explores the ways in which historiographical protocols—even, or especially, in a discipline as austere and affect-challenged as biblical scholarship—act as both medium and cover for affective investments, and it reflects on how historians might better handle (their feelings about) the early Christian past, or, indeed, any past.

Keywords:   affect theory, affective historiography, Ann Cvetkovich, The Secret Gospel of Mark, Morton Smith

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