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New Perspectives on the Union War$
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Gary W. Gallagher and Elizabeth R. Varon

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9780823284542

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2020

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823284542.001.0001

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“To Transmit and Perpetuate the Fruits of This Victory”

“To Transmit and Perpetuate the Fruits of This Victory”

Union Regimental Histories and the Great Rebellion in Immediate Retrospect

Chapter:
(p.186) “To Transmit and Perpetuate the Fruits of This Victory”
Source:
New Perspectives on the Union War
Author(s):

Peter C. Luebke

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823284542.003.0009

Taken as a genre, the regimental histories that appeared in immediate retrospect of the Civil War revealed much about how soldiers thought of themselves and the broader meaning of the conflict. Regimental histories served as a form of collaborative commemoration in literature that sought to convey the service and sacrifices of the soldiers to their home communities and thereby knit the two back together again. Overwhelmingly, regimental histories portrayed the soldiers' interpretation of the Civil War as an untroubled exhibition of patriotic duty and a mission accomplished. Insofar as the works touched upon the causes and outcomes of the Civil War, they pointed to a nefarious slave power as bringing the cataclysm upon the Union and emancipation as a wartime necessity as a way to carve the oligarchic cancer from the body politic.

Keywords:   Civil War literature, Civil War soldier, commemoration, regimental histories, soldier histories, Union soldiers

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