Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Jews and the Ends of Theory$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shai Ginsburg, Martin Land, and Jonathan Boyarin

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780823282005

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823282005.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 20 June 2021

Buber versus Scholem and the Figure of the Hasidic Jew: A Literary Debate between Two Political Theologies

Buber versus Scholem and the Figure of the Hasidic Jew: A Literary Debate between Two Political Theologies

Chapter:
(p.225) Chapter 9 Buber versus Scholem and the Figure of the Hasidic Jew: A Literary Debate between Two Political Theologies
Source:
Jews and the Ends of Theory
Author(s):

Hannan Hever

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823282005.003.0010

This chapter looks at one of the most famous and significant debates in Jewish studies: between Gershom Scholem and Martin Buber over the character of Hasidism. On the face of it, the debate was a literary one, centering on the significance of the Hasidic tale and its role in the interpretation of the Hasidic movement. It was a debate between two conceptions of Hasidism, one as a system of theological concepts, and the other as a way of life. Yet this debate was not merely historicist, but topical and political as well. For in this debate, Buber and Scholem negotiated the question of Jewish sovereignty and endeavored to determine the desired relationship between Jews and the state.

Keywords:   Jewish studies, Gershom Scholem, Martin Buber, Hasidism, Hasidic tale, Hasidic movement, Jewish sovereignty, Jews, state

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .