Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Figuring ViolenceAffective Investments in Perpetual War$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rebecca A. Adelman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780823281671

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823281671.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Feeling for Dogs in the War on Terror

Feeling for Dogs in the War on Terror

Chapter:
(p.212) Chapter 6 Feeling for Dogs in the War on Terror
Source:
Figuring Violence
Author(s):

Rebecca A. Adelman

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823281671.003.0007

This chapter is animated by a single event: a March 2008 cell phone video depicting a U.S. Marine cooing over a live puppy, which surfaced on YouTube and promptly went viral. The video is simultaneously garish in its clarity and stultifying in its indecipherability; this chapter uses it to refract a broader inquiry about mediated suffering, sympathy, and American identity. By throwing two long-established sympathies (for dogs and military personnel) into crisis, the video illuminates the mechanics of figuring and its centrality to the public culture of contemporary American militarism. The chapter begins with a detailed description of the video, attending to its key visual, audio, and narrative elements, and also the role of anger and imagination in responses to it. To provide historical context for the outrage that the perpetrators provoked, the chapter then traces evolution of anti-cruelty discourse and practice in the West. Images of military personnel and dogs working together are the focus of the next section, which explores varied affective and ideological appeals of these partnerships. Returning to the video thereafter, the analysis lingers on the reaction it provoked, and the crucial role of the puppy in engineering it, despite the multiple layers of mediation through which audiences encountered its death.

Keywords:   American identity, animal cruelty, Canine PTSD, Encarnacion, Crismarvin, mediation, Military Working Dogs, Motari, David, sentiment, sympathy

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .