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Secular LyricThe Modernization of the Poem in Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson$

John Michael

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780823279715

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823279715.001.0001

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(p.249) Index

(p.249) Index

Source:
Secular Lyric
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
abjection:
Poe and, 36–38, 71;
Whitman and, 140
Abrams, M. H., 14, 210n29
absence:
Dickinson and, 162;
Orphic myth and, 151;
Poe and, 58, 61–63, 67;
Whitman and, 92
affect:
Poe and, 36–38, 78;
Whitman and, 117, 231n50
Agamben, Giorgio, 165, 175, 177, 243n40
“L’albatros” (Baudelaire), 39–40
allegory:
Auerbach on, 219n3;
Dickinson and, 186;
Poe and, 53–55
Ammons, Archibald, 6
anaphora, Whitman and, 137
Anderson, Benedict, 4
Anderson, Charles, 197–198, 239n13, 243n3
animals:
Derrida on, 201;
Dickinson and, 185–191
“Annabel Lee” (Poe), 33
Apollinaire, Guillaume, 17
Apter, Emily, 225n12
Ariès, Philippe, 224n10
Aristotle, 56, 70, 78–79, 219n5, 220n12
Arnold, Matthew, 3, 59
art:
end of, 9–14, 209n23;
Petrarch and, 32–33;
Poe and, 33–34, 55;
Shakespeare and, 34
Aspiz, Harold, 94–95, 104
audience:
Dickinson and, 8–9, 157, 160–161, 164, 185, 187, 191;
lyric poetry and, 4–9;
Petrarch and, 32;
Poe and, 7, 25, 28–30, 33–34, 36–38, 54, 82–83;
shaggy dog story and, 188;
Whitman and, 6–7, 102
Auerbach, Erich, 117, 219n3
Augustine, saint, 32, 75
“A une passante” (Baudelaire), 223n3
“Awake ye muses nine” (Dickinson), 170–172, 182
Bakhtin, Mikhail, 208n5
Bamyeh, Mohammed, 126, 233n2
Barnstone, Aliki, 170, 241n25
Bassein, Beth Ann, 218n43
Baudelaire, Charles, 10, 66, 86, 92, 95, 215n22, 221n20, 223n3;
and Poe, 38–42, 209n24, 216n31
Bauerlein, Mark, 225n21, 231n50, 236n31
beauty:
Baudelaire and, 41;
Dickinson and, 165;
Petrarch and, 62;
“Because I could not stop for Death—”(Dickinson), 193, 195–196
Being, Whitman and, 13, 152
belief(s):
Poe and, 32, 42;
secularization and, 1–4, 11, 227n27;
Whitman and, 109–110, 117
Benjamin, Walter, 9–10, 38, 40, 138, 200
Bennett, Paula Bernat, 166, 246n36
“Berenice” (Poe), 72–78
birds, images of, 180
Blackmur, R. P., 202, 211n43
blazon:
Petrarch and, 62;
Poe and, 60–61, 63–69, 72–78;
Shakespeare and, 60
Bloom, Harold, 122
body:
Ariès on, 224n10;
Petrarch and, 31–33, 62;
Poe and, 33, 45–46, 64, 69–70;
Boggs, Colleen Glenney, 201
“The Brain—is wider than the Sky—”(Dickinson), 196–197
Bromwich, David, 132–133
Bronfen, Elisabeth, 218n42
Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 182, 244n9
Bryant, W. C., 12
Byron, George Gordon, lord, 118, 171 (p.250)
“Calamus” poems (Whitman), 6, 104, 142–144
Cameron, Sharon, 161, 189, 191, 198, 239n9
capital readers, 34, 40
Castronovo, Russ, 126–127
catachresis, Dickinson and, 178
Catullus, 13
Cavitch, Max, 91, 93, 102–103
character, term, Dickinson and, 168
Christianity, 177;
Dickinson and, 180–181;
Petrarch and, 32, 62;
Poe and, 63;
Whitman and, 119, 122
Civil War:
Dickinson and, 211n41;
Whitman and, 102–103
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, 15
comparison, tropes of, 98;
Hawthorne and, 53–55;
and meaning, 58;
Poe and, 53–88;
Whitman and, 95
concept joke, 187
consciousness, Dickinson and, 196
consistency, Poe and, 79–80
continuation, Whitman and, 150
convention, Dickinson and, 161, 192
corpse. See body
correspondence, Dickinson and, 8, 159–164, 240n14
cosmology, Poe and, 78–85
cosmopolitanism, Whitman and, 107–115
counterliteracy, Dickinson and, 174, 182
“Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” (Whitman), 96, 143
crowd, 3–4;
Dickinson and, 200;
modern, 9–12;
Whitman and, 91–153. See also audience
Culler, Jonathan, 5, 15, 158, 175, 230n48, 237n2
Dante, 117
Danto, Arthur, 10
Davies, Tony, 55
Dayan, Colin, 69
Dayan, Joan, 212n5, 222nn27–28
death:
Dickinson and, 190–198;
Emerson and, 192;
Fletcher and, 117;
in nineteenth century, 191;
Petrarch and, 62;
Poe and, 27, 56–69, 74, 81, 85–88;
and politics, 126–127;
Wittgenstein and, 91;
Wordsworth and, 131–132
deductive method, Poe and, 78–79
definition, Whitman and, 95
de Man, Paul, 166, 210n31
democracy:
nature of, 125;
Whitman and, 119, 125–153
Derrida, Jacques, 126, 201, 237n35
Dickie, Margaret, 169
Dickinson, Austin, 165
Dickinson, Emily, 157–203;
biography, and readings of, 165–170, 241nn 25, 28;
secularization of lyric and, 1–21
Dickinson, Lavinia, 165
Dimock, Wai Chee, 136, 139, 235n19
Dionysian cults, Whitman and, 150
disenchantment, 1–2
distance, Dickinson and, 157, 161, 185
dog, Dickinson and, 185–191
Donoghue, Denis, 219n5
doubt, Poe and, 42
Douglass, Frederick, 201
“A Dream within a Dream” (Poe), 58–59
earth:
Dickinson and, 178;
Whitman and, 147–149
elegy, Sacks on, 220n13, 221n22
Eliot, T. S., 43, 48, 244n7
Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 2, 11–13, 59, 82, 96, 145, 192, 199, 202, 217n36, 229n39, 236n29;
and Poe, 28, 43
“An Enigma” (Poe), 30, 34
Enlightenment:
Poe and, 72;
Whitman and, 108, 112–113
entretied, term, Whitman and, 135
epideictic rhetoric, 158, 230n45
Erkkila, Betsy, 108, 200, 212n45, 231n51
erotic:
and philosophy, 57;
Poe and, 61;
Whitman and, 231n52. See also sex
ethics, Whitman and, 107–108, 112, 114–115, 142–153, 236n30
“Eureka: A Prose Poem” (Poe), 70, 78–84
Europe, Whitman and, 107–115
expression, term, Poe and, 65–66
fakes:
of death, Whitman and, 152–153;
term, 152
fame, Poe and, 34
feeling. See affect
Feidelson, Charles, 211n44
Fisher, Philip, 139, 227n32
Fletcher, Angus, 116–118, 128
forgetting, Poe and, 63–65 (p.251)
form:
Dickinson and, 170, 189;
Poe and, 27, 42–52;
Whitman and, 99, 136
Foucault, Michel, 28
Fowler, Emily, 191
fragments, fragmentation, 3, 188–189;
Dickinson and, 165–177, 187, 189–191
Frank, Jason, 125
Freud, Sigmund, 179, 187, 220n13, 244n5
future, Whitman and, 94, 126–127, 142–153
Gasché, Rodolphe, 188
gender, Dickinson and, 164, 246n36
generativity of death, Whitman and, 104, 122
genre, 5;
Dickinson and, 159;
Poe and, 78
Geulen, Eva, 209n23
Glanvill, Joseph, 66
God:
Dickinson and, 182–183, 196;
Poe and, 80–81, 83–84;
Whitman and, 93, 120–121
Goodale, David, 108, 226n26
Gordon, Lyndall, 166–169
Gourgouris, Stathis, 207n4, 212n2
grass, Whitman on, 94–98, 104
Greene, Roland, 91–92, 107
Greene, Thomas, 31
Griswold, Rufus, 39
Grossman, Allen, 218n40
Gumbrecht, Hans Ulrech, 228n34
Hartz, Louis, 201
Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 53–54
Hegel, G. W. F., 10–11, 104, 209n23
Heginbotham, Eleanor, 181, 184
Heidegger, Martin, 201
hell, Poe and, 52
Heraclitus, 116
Higginson, Thomas Wentworth, 8, 161–163, 165
history:
and art, 10;
Jackson on, 238n8
Hoffman, Daniel, 216n33
Holland, William, 173
Hollis, C. Carroll, 227n28
Holloway, Emory, 232n55
“‘Hope’ is the thing with feathers—”(Dickinson), 179–181
“How do I love thee, let me count the ways” (Barrett Browning), 182, 244n9
Howe, Julia Ward, 103
humanism, 27;
end of, 30–36;
Poe and, 25–52, 55;
Whitman and, 138
Huyssen, Andreas, 209n25
“I.” See self
ideas/ideals:
Plato and, 116;
Poe and, 76–77
identification, Whitman and, 128–130, 139, 149
identity:
Dickinson and, 165–170;
Poe and, 69–72, 75–77, 83;
Whitman and, 107, 141
“I died for Beauty—but was scarce” (Dickinson), 193, 195
“I felt a Cleaving in my Mind—”(Dickinson), 189–190
“If you were coming in the Fall” (Dickinson), 157
“I heard a fly buzz—when I died” (Dickinson), 193–194
“I like a look of Agony” (Dickinson), 192
image, Dickinson and, 161–163, 178
imagination, Poe and, 82
“Imitation” (Poe), 59
immortality:
Dickinson and, 195–196;
Poe and, 52, 63–69, 88;
Whitman and, 122, 132–134, 150, 232n55
impermanence, Poe and, 34
inclusiveness, Whitman and, 139–140
indefinite, Poe and, 26, 56–57
indeterminacy:
Dickinson and, 175–176;
lyric, 19
indifference, Whitman and, 111–114, 132–133, 147–149, 228n32
individualism, 201, 247n39
inductive method, Poe and, 78–79
irony:
Dickinson and, 171–172, 178–198;
nature of, 180;
Poe and, 47
Irwin, John, 29, 105
“I started Early—Took my Dog—”(Dickinson), 185–188
“I tie my Hat—I crease my Shawl—”(Dickinson), 166–167
“I would not paint—a picture” (Dickinson), 157
Jackson, Virginia, 4–6, 8, 14–15, 19, 159–160, 163, 173, 179;
on counter literacy, 182;
on history, 238n8
Jakobson, Roman, 19, 116, 118, 211n42
James, William, 130–131 (p.252)
Johnson, Barbara, 219n44
Johnson, Thomas, 198
joke:
Dickinson and, 179–181, 187;
Freud on, 179
Kant, Immanuel, 75, 153
Kateb, George, 139
Keats, John, 14, 27, 29, 118, 194
knowledge:
Aristotle on, 56, 70;
Poe and, 57, 64, 67, 84–85;
Whitman and, 102–103, 123
Kristeva, Julia, 16–21, 218n40
lamentation:
Whitman and, 93, 117, 123. See also mourning
language:
Mallarmé on, 174–175;
Poe and, 42, 70, 74–75, 84–85, 219n44;
poetic, revolution in, 14–21, 201–203;
Volney and, 114;
Larson, Kerry, 15, 102, 123, 129–130, 142
Lautréaumont, comte de, 16–17
Leaves of Grass (Whitman), 20, 94–100, 114–115, 118
Lewis, R. W. B., 128, 233n8
Lewis, Sarah Anna, 34
“Ligeia” (Poe), 63–72
Lincoln, Abraham, 100–103
Locke, John, 75–76
logic, Poe and, 69–72, 78–84
Longfellow, H. W., 12, 28
loss:
Dickinson and, 192;
Petrarch and, 31, 62;
Whitman and, 100–101, 128
love:
Dickinson and, 183–184;
Poe and, 35;
Whitman and, 115–124
“The Love, a Life can show Below” (Dickinson), 183–184
“Love—thou art high—” (Dickinson), 182–183
Lowell, Robert, 43
Luciano, Dana, 14
luck, Whitman and, 13, 85, 100, 105, 150–151
Lucretius, 133, 223n4
lyric poetry:
definition of, 158;
Dickinson and, 173–174, 178;
function of, 203;
modernity and, 14–21;
nineteenth-century, 4–9;
scholarship on, 14–15, 157–159;
and truth, 12–14;
Whitman and, 91–93, 117–118. See also secularization of lyric
lyric reading:
as anachronism, 15–16, 158;
and correspondence, 159–164;
and Dickinson, 157–177, 187, 198;
scholarship on, 4–9;
term, 4
Mack, S. J., 236n29
Mallarmé, Stéphane, 16–18, 21, 41–42, 174–175
“The Man of the Crowd” (Poe), 66, 91, 138, 215n22
“Marginalia” (Poe), 26, 28
marketplace:
Poe and, 28, 40, 55, 214n19. See also audience
masochism, Poe and, 37–38, 57, 72–73
materiality:
Dickinson and, 158–159, 163–164, 181, 193;
Poe and, 74–78;
Whitman and, 93, 101, 117, 119–121, 123, 127, 134, 143
Mazzotta, Giuseppe, 31, 215n23
McGann, Jerome, 8, 14–15, 28, 238n6
McGill, Meredith L., 212n5
meaning:
comparison and, 58;
Dickinson and, 162, 166, 175–177, 180, 183–184, 190, 197;
modernity and, 12–13;
Poe and, 26–27, 55–56, 58, 67, 73–74;
poetic language and, 19–20;
Whitman and, 102, 106–107, 111, 115, 121, 140, 142–153. See also refusal
melancholy:
Baudelaire and, 38–42;
Freud on, 220n13;
metaphor and, 58;
Poe and, 25–30, 37, 43–52
memory, Poe and, 48–52
metaphor, 95;
Aristotle on, 56, 219n5, 220n12;
Auerbach on, 219n3;
Dickinson and, 180;
and meaning, 58;
versus metonymy, 135;
Petrarch and, 62;
Poe and, 38, 46, 53, 55–63, 69–72, 77, 80, 83, 85;
and romanticism, 116;
translation and, 98;
Volney and, 112–113;
Whitman and, 95–96, 100–101, 107–115
meter, Poe and, 43
metonymy:
Dickinson and, 163;
versus metaphor, 135;
and realism, 116;
Whitman and, 91–124, 134–135, 137
Mill, John Stuart, 14, 70
Miller, Cristanne, 14, 165
Miller, Perry, 211n45 (p.253)
modernity, 12–13, 202;
Baudelaire on, 215n22;
Dickinson and, 161, 174;
nineteenth century and, 21;
Poe and, 27, 29, 35, 47, 55, 57;
and poetry, 1–4, 14–21;
Whitman and, 114, 118, 138, 142–153
mold, term, Dickinson and, 162
Montaigne, Michel de, 13, 105, 114, 199, 229n40
mood:
Dickinson and, 199;
Poe and, 35
Moon, Michael, 115, 127, 163, 228n32, 229n41, 236n26
morbidity, Whitman and, 99–100
mourning:
Freud on, 220n13;
Poe and, 35, 63, 218n41;
Whitman and, 92–93, 104, 128;
Wordsworth and, 131–132. See also melancholy
movement:
Dickinson and, 195–196;
Poe and, 86–87
music:
Poe and, 42–52;
Whitman and, 105, 107
mystery:
Dickinson and, 165, 169, 184. See also refusal
Nature (Emerson), 82, 145, 217n36, 236n29
necro citizenship, Castronovo on, 127
negative capability, Keats on, 14
Nietzsche, Friedrich, 202
nonbeing, Dickinson and, 192
noncontradiction, Poe and, 70
novel, modernity and, 3
“Now I lay thee down to Sleep—”(Dickinson), 176–177
“O Captain! My Captain!” (Whitman), 100–101
“Ode on a Grecian Urn” (Keats), 27, 194
originality, Poe and, 40–41, 54, 72, 214n17
Orphic myth, Whitman and, 150–151
ostensible, term, Whitman and, 148
other, Whitman and, 115, 129
“Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking” (Whitman), 59, 146, 151
“Over and over like a Tune—” (Dickinson), 190
Ovid, 151
passion, Poe and, 26
pastiche, Dickinson and, 170–174
Pease, Donald, 130, 234n11
perfectibility, 35, 201
performance, Dickinson and, 165–166, 184–185
periodicity, Poe and, 81
Petrarch, F., 13, 30–36, 62, 215n20
Pfau, Thomas, 230n48
“The Philosophy of Composition” (Poe), 12, 25–26, 28–29, 36, 44, 46–47, 53, 58, 78
Piacentino, Edward J., 221n19
play, Dickinson and, 170–172, 189, 243n3
Poe, Edgar Allan, 25–88, 118, 201–203;
Baudelaire and, 38–42, 209n24, 216n31;
Mallarmé on, 17–18;
secularization of lyric and, 1–21;
and Whitman, 99–100
poet:
Poe and, 88;
secularization and, 20–21;
Whitman and, 138
poetics:
Dickinson and, 184–185;
Poe and, 218n42;
Whitman and, 91–124
poetry:
Derrida on, 201;
Dickinson and, 168;
Eliot on, 244n7;
Jakobson on, 211n42;
Mill on, 14;
modernization of, 1–4, 14–21;
Poe and, 26–27, 34–35, 41, 69, 84;
Whitman and, 115–118, 140. See also lyric poetry
politics, 201;
and death, 126–127;
Dickinson and, 200, 211n41;
Whitman and, 115, 118, 125–153
posthumanism, Poe and, 25–52
“The Power of Words” (Poe), 84–85
Prins, Yopie, 5–6, 14
print (mass) culture, 4;
Baudelaire and, 38–40;
Dickinson and, 8–9, 200;
Poe and, 28;
Whitman and, 7, 100
process, Dickinson and, 197–198
prophecy, Whitman and, 122
prosody:
Poe and, 42–52;
Whitman and, 100, 107–115
provocation:
Dickinson and, 175;
Whitman and, 13–14
public. See audience
Quinn, Patrick, 211n45
Ramazani, Jahan, 35
“The Raven” (Poe), 7, 28–38, 40, 44–47, 56, 58 (p.254)
reader:
capital, 34, 40;
Poe and, 33–34;
Whitman and, 127–128, 140–141, 152. See also audience
reading:
Dickinson and, 169;
Whitman and, 6–7, 140–153
realism, and metonymy, 116
reason:
and perfectibility, 35, 201;
Poe and, 69–78
receptivity, Whitman and, 139
refrain, Poe and, 44
refusal (of meaning), 13–14;
Poe and, 27, 40–41, 65–67, 76;
Volney and, 112–113;
Whitman and, 92, 94–95, 101–102, 111, 122, 124, 136, 142–153
regression, Poe and, 47–48, 82
religion:
Poe and, 63;
Whitman and, 109–110, 113, 119–120
repetition, Poe and, 44, 66–69, 80–81
repression, Dickinson and, 179–180
resistance:
Baudelaire and, 39;
Dickinson and, 162, 169, 174–175, 178–179, 185, 200;
Whitman and, 107–115, 136, 140
reversal:
Dickinson and, 182;
Poe and, 72–78
rhythm:
definition of, 44;
Poe and, 43–44
Richards, Eliza, 15, 28–29, 212n2
Ricoeur, Paul, 221n16
riddles, Dickinson and, 195–197
Rimbaud, Arthur, 163
Rizzo, Theresa, 63
“Romance (Introduction)” (Poe), 29
romanticism, and metaphor, 116
Rowlinson, Matthew, 3–4
Sacks, Peter, 150, 221n22
Sand, Georges, 108
Sappho, 13, 16, 188, 216n26
“Scented Herbage of My Breast” (Whitman), 104–106
Schlegel, Frederick, 185, 188
Schleifer, Ronald, 234n16
science, Poe and, 1, 55, 78–84
sea, poems on, 59, 185–188
secularism, secularization, 1, 3, 202;
of address, 4–9;
Dickinson and, 190;
Whitman and, 2, 114, 116, 153
secularization of lyric, 1–21, 198–203
self:
Dickinson and, 160–161, 163, 199–200;
James and, 130–31;
Petrarch and, 31;
Poe and, 25–27, 30–36;
secular, 202–3;
“Self-Reliance” (Emerson), 13, 199
sex, Whitman and, 91–92, 114–115, 120–122, 138, 231n52
shaggy dog story, 187–190, 197
Shakespeare, William, 13, 34
Shelley, P. B., 2
“She sights a Bird—she chuckles—”(Dickinson), 158
shroud, Whitman and, 141–142
“Sic transit Gloria mundi” (Dickinson), 172–173, 182
signification:
Dickinson and, 161;
Poe and, 57, 78
Sigorney, Lydia, 12
silence, Dickinson and, 167
simile, and meaning, 58
skepticism, 114;
Dickinson and, 164;
Poe and, 55–63
slavery, Whitman and, 139–140
“The Sleepers” (Whitman), 139, 141
Socarides, Alexandra, 158–159, 164, 179, 192, 238n6, 240nn 14, 18
sociability, Dickinson and, 185, 187, 200
“Song of Myself” (Whitman), 91–92, 94–99, 104, 108–111, 113, 119–122, 126, 129–130, 140–143
Song of Solomon, 57
“The Song of the Answerer” (Whitman), 123
“Song of the Broad-Axe” (Whitman), 137
“Song of the Rolling Earth” (Whitman), 144–147
“Sonnet—To Science” (Poe), 1, 55
soul:
Dickinson and, 176;
Poe and, 30, 49–52;
Whitman and, 119–120, 134, 139
sound:
Poe and, 43, 47–48, 65, 74–75;
Stewart on, 217n40;
Whitman and, 147–148
“So We’ll Go No More a Roving” (Byron), 171
Spenser, Edmund, 117
stability, lack of:
Plato and, 116;
Poe and, 34, 55–56, 63, 72, 77;
Whitman and, 117 (p.255)
Stevens, Wallace, 59, 153, 192
Stewart, Susan, 151, 217n40, 220n11
strangeness, 15;
Dickinson and, 179, 196
subjectivity:
Dickinson and, 165, 193;
modernity and, 3, 12–13;
Petrarch and, 31;
Poe and, 28, 56
substitution, tropes of, 58, 70, 79;
Poe and, 54, 98, 100
suffering:
Montaigne on, 114;
Petrarch and, 31;
Poe and, 27;
Whitman and, 103–104
surfaces:
Poe and, 54;
Whitman and, 136–142
symbolism, 174;
Whitman and, 147
Taylor, Charles, 1, 3, 227n27
Tennyson, Alfred, 48
Tertullian, 75
“There’s a certain Slant of light” (Dickinson), 162, 177, 197
“This was a Poet” (Dickinson), 179
“This World is not conclusion” (Dickinson), 14, 157
Thoreau, Henry David, 13
ticking, term, Dickinson and, 168–169
time, 199;
Dickinson and, 168–169;
Plato and, 116;
Poe and, 42–52, 58–59, 81
“ ’Tis not that Dying hurts us so—”(Dickinson), 189
Todd, Mabel Loomis, 165
“To Helen” (Poe), 60–63
“To Helen” II (Poe), 86–88
tone:
Poe and, 25–26, 36, 45, 54;
Whitman and, 106–107
translation:
nature of, 98–99;
Whitman and, 93–98, 134
transubstantiation, Whitman and, 114–115, 123
tropes:
Dickinson and, 178;
Whitman and, 118. See also comparison; substitution
truth:
lyricization of, 12–14;
Poe and, 26, 53, 55, 78, 82
“Ulalume” (Poe), 30–36, 47–52
uncanny:
Dickinson and, 179–181;
Freud on, 179, 244n5
uncertainty:
Dickinson and, 184;
shaggy dog story and, 188
understanding. See meaning
utility, 21;
Baudelaire and, 41;
Poe and, 27
utopianism, Whitman and, 107–108
Valéry, Paul, 59
Vendler, Helen, 195
Vigny, Alfred de, 39
Volney, C. F., 108–109, 112–114, 146, 226nn 24, 26
Warner, Michael, 5
Warren, James Perrin, 111–112, 231n50
Weber, Samuel, 188
Whalen, Terence, 15, 29, 33–34, 40, 42, 54, 57–58, 222n32
“When Lilacs last by the Dooryard Bloom’d” (Whitman), 102–103
Whitman, Walt, 59, 85, 91–153, 201–203;
and Poe, 99–100;
secularization of lyric and, 1–21
Whittier, John Greenleaf, 12
“Whoever You Are Holding Me Now in Your Hand” (Whitman), 6, 142–143
will, Poe and, 66–68, 73
withness:
James on, 130–131;
Whitman and, 132–136
Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 91
Witz:
Freud on, 179. See also joke
words. See language
Wordsworth, William, 27, 58, 67, 118, 131–132, 220n11, 232n55
“The Wound Dresser” (Whitman), 103–104
“you”/second person, 4, 6;
Dickinson and, 160;
Whitman and, 93–94, 118, 137. See also audience
Zak, Gur, 32–33, 214n18