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The Global South Atlantic$
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Kerry Bystrom and Joseph R. Slaughter

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823277872

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823277872.001.0001

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The African Slave Trade and the Construction of the Iberian Atlantic

The African Slave Trade and the Construction of the Iberian Atlantic

Chapter:
(p.33) The African Slave Trade and the Construction of the Iberian Atlantic
Source:
The Global South Atlantic
Author(s):

Luiz Felipe de Alencastro

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823277872.003.0002

Scholarly studies of the colonization of the Americas—especially of Latin America—have tended to minimize the role played by Africans and the African slave trade, treating the history of conquest and colonialism as a story of inevitable European domination of the hemisphere. However, from the sixteenth through the eighteenth century, colonialism in the Americas depended upon the exportation of slaves from Africa, a massive undertaking that was supported not only by Iberian Royal families but also by convoluted ideological and theological justifications elaborated by legal and religious scholars. During this period, Portugal dominated the slave trade, raiding its colonies in Southern Africa to supply its plantations (many run by Jesuits) in South America. In this sense, the story of the South Atlantic is a story of encounters and exchanges between Africa and the Americas.

Keywords:   Angola, Asiento, Brazil, Iberian Atlantic, Jesuits, Portugal, slave trade, Spain

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