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Phenomenologies of Scripture$
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Adam Y. Wells

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780823275557

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823275557.001.0001

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The Manifestation of the Father

The Manifestation of the Father

On Luke 15:11–32

Chapter:
(p.88) The Manifestation of the Father
Source:
Phenomenologies of Scripture
Author(s):

Kevin Hart

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823275557.003.0005

In this chapter, Kevin Hart argues that Jesus’ parables present (or phenomenalize) a type of phenomenological reduction from world (kosmos) to kingdom (Basileia). The goal of the parables, then, is to “nudge” readers to live according to the kingdom even while still in the world. More radical than Husserl’s reduction, Jesus’ reduction proceeds from kenosis (an “emptying out” of worldly meaning and value) to epektasis (“stretching out” toward God). Focusing on the character of the father (and Father) in the “Prodigal Son” (Luke 15:11-32), Hart maintains that compassionate fatherhood is an important aspect of the kingdom, and is ultimately (and paradoxically, from a worldly perspective) inseparable from the realities of the cross and resurrection

Keywords:   Biblical interpretation, Gospel of Luke, parable, phenomenological reduction, phenomenology, Prodigal Son

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