Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Shakespeare as a Way of Life$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James Kuzner

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823269938

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823269938.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 23 May 2022

The Winter’s Tale Faith in Law and the Law of Faith

The Winter’s Tale Faith in Law and the Law of Faith

Chapter:
(p.80) Chapter 3 The Winter’s Tale Faith in Law and the Law of Faith
Source:
Shakespeare as a Way of Life
Author(s):

James Kuzner

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823269938.003.0003

The chapter considers the ethical consequences of epistemological weakness in The Winter’s Tale. The chapter does so by examining faith in the play, with focus on what sort of law most merits faithful submission. I trace Shakespeare’s inquiry into how Leontes can be king once he loses faith in himself and must instead rule with humility. When he does, Leontes must live not above law but under it; the question is which kind of law. Shakespeare explores two possible answers, ones also explored in Paul’s epistles, in Montaigne, and in radical theory’s recent impressions of Paul. Leontes’s first option is to submit to a law of works, to a system of injunctions and prohibitions. His other, quite different option is submission to a law of faith neither normative nor juridical. Shakespeare entertains both possibilities but sees greater virtue in the law of faith, in law that presumes—and asks that all subjects embrace—intense epistemological weakness.

Keywords:   Montaigne, Saint Paul, political theology, Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .