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Academics in Action!A Model for Community-Engaged Research, Teaching, and Service$

Sandra L. Barnes, Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein, Bernadette Doykos, Nina C. Martin, and Alison McGuire

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823268795

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823268795.001.0001

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(p.273) About the Editors

(p.273) About the Editors

Source:
Academics in Action!
Publisher:
Fordham University Press

Sandra L. Barnes is a joint appointed Sociology Professor in the Department of Human and Organizational Development in Peabody College of Education and Human Development and the School of Divinity at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. Her research and teaching areas include urban sociology, sociology of religion, inequality, statistics, and African American studies. Her publications include Live Long and Prosper: How Black Megachurches Address HIV/AIDS and Poverty in the Age of Prosperity Theology (Fordham, 2012); Black Megachurch Culture: Models for Education and Empowerment (Peter Lang, 2010); Subverting the Power of Prejudice: Resources for Individual and Social Change (InterVarsity, 2006); and The Costs of Being Poor: A Comparative Study of Life in Poor Urban Neighborhoods in Gary, Indiana (SUNY, 2005). Her articles have been included in SOCIAL FORCES, Social Problems, Journal of African American Studies, and Sociological Spectrum.

Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein recently completed her Ph.D. in Community Research and Action (CRA) in Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. Her research interests include health disparities, the social determinants of health, and the intersection of HIV and incarceration. Lauren has published fourteen peer-reviewed journal articles, the most recent of which centers on the experience of intersectional stigma among HIV-positive, recently incarcerated African American men.

Bernadette Doykos is a doctoral student in the Community Research and Action (CRA) program at Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University and a Research Associate at the Center for Education Policy, Applied Research, and Evaluation at the University of Southern Maine. She is the author of several policy briefs about educational equity issues in the state of Maine. She has also contributed to a number of published articles appearing in Journal of Community Practice, Journal of Community Psychology, Social Work and Public Health, and Teachers College Record.

Nina C. Martin is an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Human Development and Psychology and Department of Human and Organizational Development in Peabody College of Education and Human Development (p.274) at Vanderbilt University. Her research interests include adolescent depression, longitudinal research methods, and the design and application of school- and community-based intervention and prevention efforts to enhance the well-being of children, adolescents, and families. Some of her articles include “Predictors of youths’ post-traumatic stress symptoms following a natural disaster: The 2010 Nashville Tennessee flood,” Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (Martin et al., forthcoming); “Peer victimization (and harsh parenting) as developmental correlates of cognitive reactivity, a diathesis for depression,” Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 123(2), 336–49 (Cole, Martin et al., 2014); and “A randomized controlled trial of a cognitive-behavioral program for the prevention of depression in adolescents compared with nonspecific and no-intervention control conditions,” Journal of Counseling Psychology, 60(3), 432–38 (Possel, Martin et al., 2013).

Allison Patten Mcguire is a Lecturer in the Department of Human and Organizational Development in Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. She has worked as a teacher in several contexts with students ranging from seventh grade through graduate school. Her doctoral training is in Community Psychology, focused on adolescent development in the context of community, specifically young people’s meaning-making processes about their involvement in community service. Her research interest is identifying and creating contexts that scaffold the development of core competencies of group and community participation, including critical and reflective thinking and conflict management. Dr. McGuire teaches lifespan human development, emphasizing the role of context and culture on human development; small group behavior and development; and community and organizational interventions focusing on changes at the group level of analysis.