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Practicing the CityEarly Modern London on Stage$
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Nina Levine

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823267866

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823267866.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

Differentiating Collaboration

Differentiating Collaboration

Protest and Playwriting and Sir Thomas More

Chapter:
(p.50) 2. Differentiating Collaboration
Source:
Practicing the City
Author(s):

Nina Levine

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823267866.003.0003

This chapter explores the relationship between the collaboratively written play text of Sir Thomas More and the play’s central scenes of protest, which depict London citizens rising up against the city’s alien population in the famous May Day riots of 1517. Even as the play retells a familiar trope of citizen identity based on the exclusion of strangers, the play simultaneously proposes an alternative structure for practicing the city in what might be called networks of collaboration. Inviting us to read the collective labor of playwrights together with the common cause of citizens, the play glimpses the possibilities for reciprocity that run counter to the institutional exclusions of early modern London, including those staged in its incendiary opening scene.

Keywords:   Sir Thomas More, aliens, May Day 1517, citizen identity, collaborative playwriting, citizen protest, politics of exclusion

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