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Democracy, Culture, CatholicismVoices from Four Continents$
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Michael J. Schuck and John Crowley-Buck

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823267309

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823267309.001.0001

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Roman Catholic Sisters and the Cultivation of Citizenship in the United States: Rich and Contentious Legacies

Roman Catholic Sisters and the Cultivation of Citizenship in the United States: Rich and Contentious Legacies

Chapter:
(p.235) Roman Catholic Sisters and the Cultivation of Citizenship in the United States: Rich and Contentious Legacies
Source:
Democracy, Culture, Catholicism
Author(s):

Bren Ortega Murphy

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823267309.003.0017

Bren Murphy offers a look at the history of Catholic women religious in the United States. These women, argues Murphy, were the religious and cultural figures most responsible for protecting, promoting, and passing on the principles of democracy, the importance of culture, and the Catholic faith to both immigrants and citizens in the United States. Through social activism, community service, and education (to name but a few of their accomplishments), women religious have been responsible for passing on the Catholic faith and for imparting notions of democratic citizenship and civility to both the immigrant populations and citizens whom they serve. Murphy suggests that good Catholics have become good democratic citizens because of the efforts of women religious. At the same time, however, Murphy notes that the relationships between women religious in the United States and the hierarchy of the Catholic Church have been—in spite of the tremendous impact women religious have had on the processes of civil discourse and democratization—both fairly uncivil and decidedly undemocratic.

Keywords:   Catholicism, citizenship, democracy, education, hierarchy, immigration, social activism, United States, women religious

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