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Democracy, Culture, CatholicismVoices from Four Continents$
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Michael J. Schuck and John Crowley-Buck

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823267309

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823267309.001.0001

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Alter/native Democracies: Muslim and Catholic Negotiations of Culture, Religion, and Citizenship in the Twenty-First Century

Alter/native Democracies: Muslim and Catholic Negotiations of Culture, Religion, and Citizenship in the Twenty-First Century

Chapter:
(p.134) Alter/native Democracies: Muslim and Catholic Negotiations of Culture, Religion, and Citizenship in the Twenty-First Century
Source:
Democracy, Culture, Catholicism
Author(s):

Marcia Hermansen

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823267309.003.0010

Marcia Hermansen looks to Catholicism and its encounters with democracy, particularly in the recent history of the Catholic Church, for examples to which Islam and the Muslim world can look in order to learn about navigating the inevitable, contemporary encounter between religion and democracy. Noting that Catholics have held both minority and majority positions in different democratic countries, Hermansen argues that the history of Catholic engagements with democracy can be a model for Islam as it continues to deliberate over whether or not democracy is the most appropriate political system for it to embrace. Building on the work of sociologist Jose Casanova, Hermansen analyzes two democratizing practices—reserved seats for minorities in Muslim-dominant governments and the protection of minority rights—found in Jordan, Lebanon, and Pakistan, and suggests that, in the wake of the Catholic experience of democratization, Muslim countries can responsibly and faithfully envision the possibility of creating alter/native democracies in their own contexts.

Keywords:   alter/native democracy, Jose Casanova, Catholicism, Islam, Jordan, Lebanon, minority rights, Pakistan, reserved seats

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