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Plasticity and PathologyOn the Formation of the Neural Subject$
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David Bates and Nima Bassiri

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780823266135

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823266135.001.0001

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Integrations, Vigilance, Catastrophe

Integrations, Vigilance, Catastrophe

The Neuropsychiatry of Aphasia in Henry Head and Kurt Goldstein

Chapter:
(p.112) 5 Integrations, Vigilance, Catastrophe
Source:
Plasticity and Pathology
Author(s):

Stefanos Geroulanos

Todd Meyers

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823266135.003.0005

This chapter is part of a broader project concerned with the ways in which, around World War I, the disciplines dealing with the human body exhibited a marked shift toward medical and physiological theories of bodily integration. It first touches on Charles Scott Sherrington’s understanding of integration in the nervous system, which lay at the foundation of neurological and neurophysiological conceptions of integration since the publication of his Integrative Action of the Nervous System in 1906. Sherrington plowed the land on which neurology would situate the problem of bodily integrity, fundamentally displacing earlier attempts to think wholeness at the corporeal level. It then turns to the development of the ideas of neurologists Henry Head and Kurt Goldstein, particularly the structure of their theories of wholeness. The final section focuses on the divergence between Head’s Aphasia and Kindred Disorders of Speech and Goldstein’s The Organism, attending to the profound differences resulting from the different conceptual and experimental priorities of the two thinkers, as well as the value and significance of disintegration as they imagine it.

Keywords:   human body, bodily integration, Charles Scott Sherrington, nervous system, Henry Head, Kurt Goldstein, neurologists

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