Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Bread of the StrongLacouturisme and the Folly of the Cross, 1910-1985$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jack Downey

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823265435

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823265435.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 19 January 2022

To Afflict the Comfortable and Comfort the Afflicted

To Afflict the Comfortable and Comfort the Afflicted

Catholic Worker Pacifism as a Form-of-Life

Chapter:
(p.201) Epilogue: To Afflict the Comfortable and Comfort the Afflicted
Source:
The Bread of the Strong
Author(s):

Jack Lee Downey

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823265435.003.0007

This epilogue examines Dorothy Day's absolute pacifism as part of her maximalist practical theology. It considers the pacifist form-of-life that Day defended in the face of World War II and how it corresponded to her evangelical poverty as both a form of witness and technique for forming Christian conscience. From its inception in 1933, the Catholic Worker movement hit the streets with a distinctive amalgamation of radical politics and maximalist Christian spirituality, maintaining a dogged opposition to all forms of militarism as an evangelical sign of contradiction against the prevailing “just war” traditions that dominated Catholic moral theology and international policy. This chapter discusses the influence of Lacouturisme—largely under the stewardship of John Hugo—along with Peter Maurin and other critical interventions in Day's spiritual development on Christian maximalism that became the hallmark of the Catholic Worker personalism.

Keywords:   pacifism, Dorothy Day, theology, evangelical poverty, Catholic Worker movement, Christian spirituality, militarism, Christian maximalism, Lacouturisme, John Hugo

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .