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The Bread of the StrongLacouturisme and the Folly of the Cross, 1910-1985$
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Jack Downey

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780823265435

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823265435.001.0001

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Dorothy Day, Anti-triumphalism, and a Personalist Approach to Voluntary Poverty

Dorothy Day, Anti-triumphalism, and a Personalist Approach to Voluntary Poverty

Chapter:
(p.169) 6 Dorothy Day, Anti-triumphalism, and a Personalist Approach to Voluntary Poverty
Source:
The Bread of the Strong
Author(s):

Jack Lee Downey

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823265435.003.0006

This chapter examines Dorothy Day's role as an advocate of Lacouturisme in the United States. Day was historically the most famous Lacouturite disciples. During her lifetime and following her death in 1980, the retreat movement gained publicity and credibility directly from her close affiliation. Day first learned of the Lacouture retreat in the late 1930s and was subsequently introduced to its doctrinal substance by a Josephite priest named Pacifique Roy, who served as a gateway to John Hugo and played a critical animating role in Day's formation. The effect on Day was as profound as it was instantaneous, unraveling her previous disenchantment with the stark, hollow veneer of Catholic contemplative life. She would later rave about her first exposure to the retreat in an unfinished manuscript titled All Is Grace. This chapter considers Day's path towards Lacouturisme, her conversion to Catholicism, her early years at the Catholic Worker movement, and her encounter with Peter Maurin and his indoctrination. It also discusses the retreat's doctrine of suffering.

Keywords:   retreat movement, Dorothy Day, Lacouturisme, United States, Pacifique Roy, conversion, Catholicism, Catholic Worker movement, Peter Maurin, doctrine of suffering

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