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Divine EnjoymentA Theology of Passion and Exuberance$
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Elaine Padilla

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263561

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263561.001.0001

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Permeability

Permeability

The Open Wounds of the Lovers’ Flesh

Chapter:
(p.86) Three Permeability
Source:
Divine Enjoyment
Author(s):

Elaine Padilla

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263561.003.0004

Recasting passion as joy mixed with pain, and based on the previous chapter’s insights on the meaning of the divine ecstasy, this chapter develops the notion of divine desire or yearning, in the sense of a God who in being passionate, loves according to the flesh, that is, permeably. As the first chapter’s work of Latin American feminists alludes, in this chapter God enjoys the cosmos in giving and receiving the pain and the enjoyments of the cosmos by means of a divine wound that mystic St. Teresa de Avila poetically imagines, and that feminist Luce Irigaray views as the site of female and divine exchanges of pleasure. God begins to transfigure into the silhouette of the excessive lover, erotically loving the cosmos as Jean-Luc Marion explicitly expresses, yet in being similar to the creaturely lovemaking rhythms, via narrowing distance between all lovers.

Keywords:   lover, distance, permeable, flesh, jouissance, ecstasy, virginity, transfiguration, sadomasochism, lovemaking

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