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After FukushimaThe Equivalence of Catastrophes$
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Jean-Luc Nancy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823263387

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

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Chapter:
(p.21) 5
Source:
After Fukushima
Author(s):

Jean-Luc Nancy

, Charlotte Mandell
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823263387.003.0006

This chapter warns of possible errors in the future. Fukushima is the apocalypse to what was Hiroshima. By using atomic power, it becomes possible to dissuade confrontation, and hail this as a strategy toward achieving peace, toward balancing and stopping terror. But this weapon of dissuasion begets in others also the desire to own and possess such weapons. This use of atomic weapons does not enhance relationships because there is no kind of relationship that exists to speak when everything is confronted with nuclear weapons as deterrents. It is not like David and Goliath, nor Ulysses and the Cyclops. This kind of balance destroys any and all relationships as there is no longer confrontation, as it is already so much dependent on human will to command. A little mistake or the proverbial mad scientist can end it all. This situation is therefore beyond anything calculable as the effects of the decision itself would be immense.

Keywords:   David and Goliath, Ulysses and the Cyclops, nuclear weapons, deterrents

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