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The RejectCommunity, Politics, and Religion after the Subject$
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Irving Goh

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823262687

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823262687.001.0001

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Clinamen, or The Auto-Reject for “Posthuman” Futures

Clinamen, or The Auto-Reject for “Posthuman” Futures

Chapter:
(p.218) 5 Clinamen, or The Auto-Reject for “Posthuman” Futures
Source:
The Reject
Author(s):

Irving Goh

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823262687.003.0005

This chapter takes critical distance with regard to turning to others so as to theorize or put into effect the auto-reject. This will have a certain impact on contemporary “posthuman” discourse, especially Cary Wolfe’s “posthumanism,” which seeks an answer to the question of “who comes after the subject?” in animals, disabled beings, and machinic systems, all of which have been forms of rejects in dominant intellectual discourses not too long ago. This chapter raises the concern of regulating, neutralizing, taming, and acculturating the other-reject and its differences when one looks to the other-reject for one’s theorizing. It then proposes to think the auto-reject in oneself. It suggests a return to the notion of clinamen. Clinamen refers to the process by which molecules detach themselves from the body without the body controlling any of this dissociation and where those molecules end up. Clinamen, in other words, is auto-rejection without needing recourse to the other. And when there is no single body determining or essentializing the free dissociation and subsequent encounters of corporeal molecules, clinamen opens up, perhaps, to a possibility of another politics and ethics without subject.

Keywords:   Auto-Reject, Clinamen, Clinamen, Michel Serres, Bacteria, GFA-J1, Posthumanism, Felisa Wolfe-Simon, Cary Wolfe

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