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The People’s Right to the NovelWar Fiction in the Postcolony$
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Eleni Coundouriotis

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823262335

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823262335.001.0001

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Contesting the New Authenticity:

Contesting the New Authenticity:

Contemporary War Fiction in Africa

Chapter:
(p.220) Chapter 4 Contesting the New Authenticity
Source:
The People’s Right to the Novel
Author(s):

Eleni Coundouriotis

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823262335.003.0005

This chapter examines African war novels published since 2000 against the backdrop of the literary history developed in the rest of the study. The chapter focuses extensively on novels that eschew the easy formulas of child soldier narratives that dominated African fiction in the late 1990s and returned metropolitan audiences to a cliché of Africa as heart of darkness. By contrast, Nuruddin Farah’s Links offers a complex meditation on the ethics of humanitarian intervention and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of Yellow Sun reinvents the domestic novel, extending the project of a people’s history central to the literature of the Nigerian Civil War. Furthermore, both authors engage with the influence of journalistic depictions of war, and thus Farah offers an important response to Mark Bowden’s bestselling Black Hawk Down.

Keywords:   Nuruddin Farah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, child soldiers, domestic novel, Black Hawk Down, humanitarian intervention, Nigerian Civil War

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