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Religious Women in Early Carolingian FranciaA Study of Manuscript Transmission and Monastic Culture$
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Felice Lifshitz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823256877

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823256877.001.0001

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“The Sensual Man Does Not Perceive Those Things That Are of the Spirit of God” (1 Corinthians 2:14): History and Theology in the Stories of the Saints

“The Sensual Man Does Not Perceive Those Things That Are of the Spirit of God” (1 Corinthians 2:14): History and Theology in the Stories of the Saints

Chapter:
(p.112) Chapter Six “The Sensual Man Does Not Perceive Those Things That Are of the Spirit of God” (1 Corinthians 2:14): History and Theology in the Stories of the Saints
Source:
Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia
Author(s):

Felice Lifshitz

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823256877.003.0006

This chapter uses a “whole book” approach to analyse holistically two original collections of texts: the oldest extant collection of passions of the apostles (Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek M.p.th.f. 78, from Karlburg) and the “Deus per Angelum” libellus (Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek M.p.th.q. 28b part 1, from Kitzingen). The component parts of both books were produced, in many cases by women, over a span of centuries and in various locales (including, in the case of the passio of Matthew, in contemporary Karlburg), but were forged together in their respective scriptoria into monuments of feminist history and theology. Both books functioned historiographically, recounting a particular stage in the spread of Christianity (the apostolic era in the east, and a slightly later era on the Italian peninsula respectively), while constructing female figures as central to the conversion process, whether as main protagonists (the Italian martyrs Cecilia, Juliana, Agnes, and Agatha of the libellus) or crucial supporters (numerous aristocratic, royal and/or consecrated women in the apostolic passionary). Theologically, the compilers of both books activated radically feminist readings of the significance of Mary, mother of Jesus, to human salvation, whereas the Kitzingen Anonyma (author of the “Deus per Angelum” libellus) also articulated a strong (Pelagian) theology of merit.

Keywords:   “Whole book” approaches to manuscripts, Libelli (manuscript booklets), Apostolic passionaries, Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek M.p.th.f. 78, Mary, Mother of Jesus, Pelagius, Cecilia, Roman martyr, Agnes, Roman martyr, Juliana of Nicomedia, martyr, Agatha of Catania, martyr

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