Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Religious Women in Early Carolingian FranciaA Study of Manuscript Transmission and Monastic Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Felice Lifshitz

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823256877

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823256877.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 29 January 2020

Chapter Four“I Am Crucified in Christ” (Galatians 2:20): The Kitzingen Crucifixion Miniature and Visions of the Apostle Paul

Chapter Four“I Am Crucified in Christ” (Galatians 2:20): The Kitzingen Crucifixion Miniature and Visions of the Apostle Paul

Chapter:
(p.65) Chapter Four“I Am Crucified in Christ” (Galatians 2:20): The Kitzingen Crucifixion Miniature and Visions of the Apostle Paul
Source:
Religious Women in Early Carolingian Francia
Author(s):

Felice Lifshitz

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823256877.003.0004

This chapter discusses the famous full page crucifixion miniature in Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek M.p.th.f. 69 in relation to the text it was intended to introduce, namely, the letters of St. Paul. The chapter argues that the key figures in the image (the large central figure amid a group in a boat, and the figure on the large central cross) represent both Paul and Jesus. The chapter identifies the many sources of inspiration used by the Kitzingen theologian-artist, including the Dittochaeon of Prudentius, Origen’s Homilies on Numbers, and a version of the Visio Pauli (Vision of St. Paul) very likely written at Kitzingen and certainly present in its library collection. A gendered analysis of this image shows how the theologian-artist generally emphasized the universal and thus gender-egalitarian nature of the message of Pauline Christianity, but also expressed views designed to support professed women’s central and active role in the ecclesiastical life of the Main Valley.

Keywords:   Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek M.p.th.f. 69, Kitzingen, theologian-artists, manuscript illumination, crucifixion scenes, Pauline Epistles, Vision of St. Paul (Visio Pauli), Text-image relations, Prudentius, Dittochaeon, Origen, Homilies on Numbers

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .