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Making Italian AmericaConsumer Culture and the Production of Ethnic Identities$
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Simone Cinotto

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780823256235

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823256235.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

The Immigrant Enclave as Theme Park

The Immigrant Enclave as Theme Park

Culture, Capital, and Urban Change in New York’s Little Italies

Chapter:
(p.225) 13 The Immigrant Enclave as Theme Park
Source:
Making Italian America
Author(s):

Ervin Kosta

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823256235.003.0014

The chapter compares two New York’s Little Italies—the “Little Italy” on Lower Manhattan’s Mulberry Street, and the “Real Little Italy” of Arthur Avenue in the Bronx. The historical trajectories of the neighborhoods—from immigrant enclaves to popular ethnic theme parks for international tourists—is framed within postindustrial urban change and the turn of cultural production into most profitable investment for financial capital. Confronted with the loss of their residents of Italian origin, both neighborhoods owe their continued significance as “Italian” spaces to the construction of commodified versions of their ethnic pasts for consumption by a variegated clientele. However, their commercial ethnicities have emerged in particular ways that reflect the geographic, economic, demographic, and ethnic and racial conditions of their local histories.

Keywords:   ethnic enclaves, ethnic tourism, cultural tourism, theme parks, Little Italy, Bronx, consumer culture, Italian Americans, ethnic restaurants, ethnic entrepreneurship, New York City

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