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Beyond Broadband AccessDeveloping Data-Based Information Policy Strategies$
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Richard D. Taylor and Amit M. Schejter

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780823251834

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823251834.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 23 October 2019

PhD Heal Thyself

PhD Heal Thyself

In Search of Evidence-based Research for Evidence-based Policy

Chapter:
(p.131) Chapter 8 PhD Heal Thyself
Source:
Beyond Broadband Access
Author(s):

Eli Noam

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823251834.003.0008

This chapter focuses on the use and abuse of data for information policy development and the search for evidence-based research for evidence-based policy. It considers the debate over media concentration as an important element in the struggle over rules and power in the new economy and suggests that empirical evidence is secondary in this debate, used by academics selectively and in pursuit of advocacy rather than of science. It provides some of the numbers relevant to the debate, along with the dynamics underlying them. It also asks whether Congress and the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) are interested in serious data analysis. It identifies a specific structural impediment in the rule-making process and recommends a requirement for an “academic impact statement” in rulemakings, which would be an independent literature review of relevant peer-reviewed literature.

Keywords:   information policy, data analysis, media concentration, new economy, empirical evidence, rule-making, academic impact statement, evidence-based research, evidence-based policy

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