Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Intellectual Origins of the Global Financial Crisis$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Roger Berkowitz and Taun N. Toay

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823249602

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823249602.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 17 October 2019

Introduction The Burden of Our Times

Introduction The Burden of Our Times

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction The Burden of Our Times
Source:
The Intellectual Origins of the Global Financial Crisis
Author(s):

Roger Berkowitz

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823249602.003.0001

Cheap money is often said to be the origin of the global financial crisis. Others say that the crisis, like all economic crises, are just part of capitalism. But such an explanation, however true, risks normalizing the crisis and shies from affixing blame and making judgments. Building on Hannah Arendt's work, this introduction argues that the intellectual origins of the financial crisis lie in the elevation of economic over political thinking and the retreat of political thinking in the 20th century. The economic and scientific spirit of our age means that whatever can be done, should be done. Thus political judgment limiting action—economic, global, or scientific—is increasingly an anachronism.

Keywords:   Cheap Money, Imperialism, Global Financial Crisis, Capitalist Ethic, Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism, Economic security, Political Liberty, Max Weber, John Stuart Mill

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .