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Empire's WakePostcolonial Irish Writing and the Politics of Modern Literary Form$
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Mark Quigley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823245444

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823245444.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 28 July 2021

Conclusion: Dispatches from the Modernist Frontier: “European and Asiatic papers please copy”

Conclusion: Dispatches from the Modernist Frontier: “European and Asiatic papers please copy”

Chapter:
(p.207) Conclusion: Dispatches from the Modernist Frontier: “European and Asiatic papers please copy”
Source:
Empire's Wake
Author(s):

Mark Quigley

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823245444.003.0006

This chapter considers the treatment of primitivism and a radical incommensurability portrayed by Joyce in Portrait of the Artist and Stephen Hero as a means of reflecting on the legacy of Irish late modernist aesthetics and the ways its interrogations of modernist subjectivity and cosmopolitanism are themselves seeded by Joyce in anticipation of the modernist interventions of both the Blasket writers and Samuel Beckett. The chapter proposes that a reconsideration of Joyce’s relationship to postcoloniality and to the generation of Irish writers that follow him opens a series of new possibilities for modernist studies especially as it grapples with the spaces and concerns of so-called global modernism.

Keywords:   James Joyce, Stephen Hero, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Cosmopolitanism, Primitivism, Late modernism, Modernist studies, Postcolonial modernism, Global modernism

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