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The Discipline of Philosophy and the Invention of Modern Jewish Thought$
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Willi Goetschel

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823244966

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823244966.001.0001

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Contradiction Set Free: Hermann Levin Goldschmidt’s Philosophy out of the Sources of Judaism

Contradiction Set Free: Hermann Levin Goldschmidt’s Philosophy out of the Sources of Judaism

Chapter:
(p.114) Seven Contradiction Set Free: Hermann Levin Goldschmidt’s Philosophy out of the Sources of Judaism
Source:
The Discipline of Philosophy and the Invention of Modern Jewish Thought
Author(s):

Willi Goetschel

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823244966.003.0007

This chapter examines Hermann Levin Goldschmidt's dialogic thought and his call for the recognition of contradiction as a critical imperative in modern philosophy. It discusses Goldschmidt's argument that philosophy needs to recognize the philosophic importance of the sources of Jewish tradition in order for philosophy to be self-consistent and relevant. This chapter also argues that Goldschmidt's call for unrestricted autonomy for cultural self-determination is not conceived as an exclusive demand but rather as one that is to be granted universally and that Jewish self-determination and philosophy “out of the sources of Judaism” is thus not an end in itself but rather a paradigmatic test case for how the project of philosophy as well as society in general can be reimagined as modern and genuinely multicultural.

Keywords:   Hermann Levin Goldschmidt, dialogic thought, modern philosophy, Jewish tradition, cultural self-determination, Judaism, contradiction

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