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Medieval Poetics and Social PracticeResponding to the Work of Penn R. Szittya$
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Seeta Chaganti

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823243242

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823243242.001.0001

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Fabulous Women, Fables of Patronage Metham's Amoryus and Cleopes and BL MS Additional 10304

Fabulous Women, Fables of Patronage Metham's Amoryus and Cleopes and BL MS Additional 10304

Chapter:
(p.124) Fabulous Women, Fables of Patronage Metham's Amoryus and Cleopes and BL MS Additional 10304
Source:
Medieval Poetics and Social Practice
Author(s):

Kara Doyle

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823243242.003.0008

Kara Doyle focuses on medieval women as literary patrons; as she points out, “in the Middle Ages, the relationship between poetry and social practice is often negotiated through the mechanisms of patronage.” Doyle's essay, “Commemorating Patrons, Memorializing Women: Metham's Amoryus and Cleopes and BL MS Additional 10304,” argues that in the century after Chaucer's death, the increased presence of female patrons reconfigured the relationship between poetry and social behavior. Traditionally, poets like Chaucer and Boccaccio dictated prescriptions for female behavior. In the fifteenth century, by contrast, women's behavioral practices themselves could “shape poetry before and as it [was] being written.” The works of John Metham and the anonymous Middle English translator of part of Boccaccio's De Mulieribus Claris, Doyle demonstrates, reflect their female patrons' and audiences' power to revise the meaning of classical feminine ideals.

Keywords:   John Metham, Amoryus and Cleopes, Giovanni Boccaccio, De mulieribus claris, Women, Gender, Patron, Patronage, Manuscripts, Poetics, medieval

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