Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Loaded Words$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Marjorie Garber

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823242047

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823242047.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 31 July 2021

Radical Numbers

Radical Numbers

Chapter:
(p.173) CHAPTER FOURTEEN Radical Numbers
Source:
Loaded Words
Author(s):

Marjorie Garber

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823242047.003.0015

In 2003, Drs. Sean and Judith Palfrey, the masters of Adams House at Harvard University, invited students and other concerned citizens to get involved in the debates and to reflect upon the implications for themselves and for the country. In this case, the conflict in question was the pending invasion of Iraq. On January 5, 1968, Dr. Benjamin Spock, the celebrated author of Baby and Child Care, the bible for a generation of anxious American parents, and four co-defendants were charged with conspiracy “to hinder and interfere with the administration of the Universal Military and Training Act.” In other words, they had advised young people to resist the draft. The defendants in the Spock trial became known as the Boston Five. The Boston Five, the Chicago Seven, and the New Haven Nine are radical numbers. To at least some of today's audiences and readers, these numbers will be more mysterious than revealing. Each of these was a group of radical intellectuals, or intellectual radicals, trying to make a difference.

Keywords:   Judith Palfrey, Benjamin Spock, Boston Five, Chicago Seven, New Haven Nine, radical intellectuals, intellectual radicals, trial, conspiracy, Military and Training

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .