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Enlightened SentimentsJudgment and Autonomy in the Age of Sensibility$
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Hina Nazar

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823240074

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823240074.001.0001

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Sentimentalism and the Discourses of Freedom: The Aesthetic Analogy from Hume to Arendt

Sentimentalism and the Discourses of Freedom: The Aesthetic Analogy from Hume to Arendt

Chapter:
(p.37) 2. Sentimentalism and the Discourses of Freedom: The Aesthetic Analogy from Hume to Arendt
Source:
Enlightened Sentiments
Author(s):

Hina Nazar

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823240074.003.0003

This chapter explores how sentimental moral philosophy engages the modern norm of autonomy by honing in on a hallmark of sentimental ethics from Shaftesbury to Adam Smith: its treatment of moral experience as broadly analogous to aesthetic experience. The sentimentalists’ use of an aesthetic analogy for moral judgment produces an unexpected connection to the Kantian liberal tradition, with which the concept of autonomy is most closely associated, and more particularly, to interpretations of Kant's Critique of Judgment. Attention is drawn especially to the parallels that emerge between judgment as theorized by Hume and Smith, on the one hand, and by interpreters of Kant like Hannah Arendt, on the other hand, by way of delineating a revisionist reading of Kantian autonomy that is context-sensitive and vectored in a this-worldly direction.

Keywords:   Autonomy, Judgment, Aesthetics, Ethics, Immanuel Kant, Hannah Arendt, David Hume, Adam Smith

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