Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Miracle and MachineJacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Naas

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823239979

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823239979.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

“Jewgreek is Greekjew”

“Jewgreek is Greekjew”

Messianicity—Khōra—Democracy

Chapter:
(p.152) 6 “Jewgreek is Greekjew”
Source:
Miracle and Machine
Author(s):

Michael Naas

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823239979.003.0008

This chapter returns much more closely to “Faith and Knowledge” in order to explain two “‘historical’ names”—messianicity and khōra—for the opening or the promise that is one of the two sources of religion as well as science. The chapter asks why Derrida sees the need to supplement a Judeo-Christian notion of messianicity with a thinking of the Greek khōra from Plato’s Timaeus, a text he once called a “Bible avant la letter.” Finally, this chapter tries to explain a few of Derrida’s more elliptical comments in “Faith and Knowledge” on democracy and literature as the right to say everything in light of other texts from around the same time on these same subjects. Such themes are hardly extrinsic, it is argued, to the principal theses of Derrida’s essay since they require a rethinking of what Derrida believes to be the Judeo-Christian origins not only of the concept of religion but of literature, democracy, religious tolerance, even secularism.

Keywords:   Jacques Derrida, Religion, Messianicity, Khora, Democracy, Religious Tolerance, Literature, Secularism

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .