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Fordham University School of LawA History$
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Robert J. Kaczorowski

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823239559

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823239559.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

World War II and its Aftermath

World War II and its Aftermath

Chapter:
(p.178) Chapter Five World War II and its Aftermath
Source:
Fordham University School of Law
Author(s):

Robert J. Kaczorowski

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823239559.003.0005

Chapter 5 discusses the impact of World War II on law students and legal education and the nation’s and state’s responses. Dean Wilkinson again played a leading role in shaping and achieving changes in national and state standards to accommodate law students who were drafted out of law school and returning veterans. It explains accelerated programs and the establishment of summer sessions with rolling enrollments and graduations during the war. The Law School admitted foreign educated lawyers who fled Nazi Germany and countries it occupied to practice law in the U.S. Law School graduates gained access to positions with the city’s elite law firms. After the war the Law School joined a select group of law schools in adopting a college degree requirement for admission. The G.I. Bill strengthened the Law School’s financial condition, but Fordham University continued to use the Law School to subsidize its other divisions. This prevented the Law School from adopting changes in its program that were occurring in the leading law schools. It also continued Dean Wilkinson’s practice-oriented conception of legal education, and the Law School lost its place as the second law school in New York City to New York University School of Law.

Keywords:   World War II, law school accommodations to draftees and returning veterans, foreign lawyers as law students, placement in leading law firms, G.I. Bill, tuition dependence and its consequences, financial relationship to Fordham University, post-war education reform

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