Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Fordham University School of LawA History$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert J. Kaczorowski

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823239559

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823239559.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2019

The Quest for Excellence in an Era of Bigotry

The Quest for Excellence in an Era of Bigotry

Chapter:
(p.80) Chapter Three The Quest for Excellence in an Era of Bigotry
Source:
Fordham University School of Law
Author(s):

Robert J. Kaczorowski

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823239559.003.0003

Chapter 3 recounts the leadership of Dean Ignatius M. Wilkinson in achieving higher admission and academic standards in legal education generally and Fordham Law School specifically. The school became one of a handful of law schools with a selective admission policy. Wilkinson restructured the Law School’s administration and activities, reviving moot court, establishing instruction in law library research, creating the Law School Alumni Association and placement office. It explains the experiences of Fordham law students in the context of the social and economic history of the 1920s, discusses the religious and ethnic prejudice directed against religious and ethnic minorities, especially Catholics and their affiliated ethnic groups that comprised the majority of the Law School’s student body. It discusses the success of Fordham Law School graduates to gain admission to the bar in an era in which state bar associations manipulated bar examination results and admission standards to exclude from the practice of law urban immigrants who were members of religious, ethnic and racial minorities. Recounts the leadership of Dean Ignatius M. Wilkinson in achieving higher admission and academic standards in legal education generally and Fordham Law School specifically. The school became one of a handful of law schools with a selective admission policy. Wilkinson restructured the Law School’s administration and activities, reviving moot court, establishing instruction in law library research, creating the Law School Alumni Association and placement office. It explains the experiences of Fordham law students in the context of the social and economic history of the 1920s, discusses the religious and ethnic prejudice directed against religious and ethnic minorities, especially Catholics and their affiliated ethnic groups that comprised the majority of the Law School’s student body. It discusses the success of Fordham Law School graduates to gain admission to the bar in an era in which state bar associations manipulated bar examination results and admission standards to exclude from the practice of law urban immigrants who were members of religious, ethnic and racial minorities.

Keywords:   Dean Ignatius M. Wilkinson, pre-law academic requirements, selective admission, Fordham law student experiences, alumni association, job placement, xenophobia, anti-Catholic prejudice, anti-Semitism, Ku Klux Klan, bar exam passage rates

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .