Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
ThingsReligion and the Question of Materiality$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dick Houtman and Birgit Meyer

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823239450

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823239450.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

Rhetoric of the Heart: Figuring the Body in Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Rhetoric of the Heart: Figuring the Body in Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Chapter:
(p.90) Rhetoric of the Heart: Figuring the Body in Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Source:
Things
Author(s):

David Morgan

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823239450.003.0006

This chapter addresses modern Catholic devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, originating in the appearances of Jesus experienced by nun Margaret-Mary Alacoque (1647–90). Since the seventeenth century, understandings of the Heart of Jesus have shifted from visceral to symbolic registers: from a fetish (a concealing object standing in for something else) to an icon (an image) and, finally, to a mere symbol (a sign). Yet from the eighteenth century up to the present day, the status of the Sacred Heart has remained a source of theological contestation between Jesuits and orthodox Catholics, who emphasize its viscerality, and Jansenist Protestants and Catholic reformers, who treat it as a symbol.

Keywords:   Sacred heart, Fetish, Icon, Symbol, Metaphor, Body, Devotion, Penance, Jansenism, Jesuits

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .