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Jesuit and Feminist EducationIntersections in Teaching and Learning for the Twenty-first Century$
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Jocelyn M. Boryczka, Elizabeth A. Petrino, Jeffrey P. von Arx, and Charles L. Currie

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233311

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823233311.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 04 July 2022

Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum

Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum

Chapter:
(p.56) 3 Early Jesuit Pedagogy and the Subordination of Women: Resources from the Ratio Studiorum
Source:
Jesuit and Feminist Education
Author(s):

Colleen McCluskey

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823233311.003.0004

This chapter explores the extent to which the Ratio Studiorum (1599), a cornerstone of Ignatian pedagogy, contains methods for self-critique that might have allowed the early Jesuits to conceive of a more liberal attitude toward women. Although the typical course of study for university students, heavily weighted toward Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas, contained biased notions of gender, the authors of the Ratio Studiorum also advocated exclusive “domains of responsibilities” that accorded females some independence and equality as wives. It concludes that Jesuit pedagogy allows for—even encourages—the active self-questioning that would permit a critical reading of philosophers and theologians. Hence, “the Ratio Studiorum could have provided the early Jesuits with tools that might have enabled them to recognize and challenge the unjust subordination and oppression of women”.

Keywords:   Ignatian pedagogy, teaching, Jesuits, women, equality, independence, oppression, suburodination

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