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Civil Rights in New York CityFrom World War II to the Giuliani Era$
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Clarence Taylor

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823232895

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.001.0001

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“One City, One Standard”: The Struggle for Equality in Rudolph Giuliani's New York

“One City, One Standard”: The Struggle for Equality in Rudolph Giuliani's New York

Chapter:
(p.204) 10 “One City, One Standard”: The Struggle for Equality in Rudolph Giuliani's New York
Source:
Civil Rights in New York City
Author(s):

Clarence Taylor

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823232895.003.0011

“One City, One Standard.” Rudolph Giuliani, New York's mayor from 1994 to 2001, defined his administration, and himself, through these words. They were more than a campaign slogan, although they served him well as such during his successful 1993 bid for City Hall. The historian Martha Biondi has shown how black activists worked in New York during the years following World War II for what she terms “full equality.” Their struggle was for much more than equality under the law. They sought a substantive form of justice that was avowedly “rare conscious” and identity based. They demanded fair housing practices, an end to lending discrimination, curbs on police behavior, an emphasis on black culture in the public educational system, and, generally, the reallocation and equalization of resources in the city.

Keywords:   New York, Rudolph Giuliani, equality, justice, black culture

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