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The Basic Writings of Josiah Royce, Volume ICulture, Philosophy, and Religion$
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John J. McDermott

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780823224838

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.5422/fordham/9780823224838.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Shelley and the Revolution

Shelley and the Revolution

Chapter:
(p.227) 7 Shelley and the Revolution
Source:
The Basic Writings of Josiah Royce, Volume I
Author(s):
John J. McDermott
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fordham/9780823224838.003.0007

This chapter presents Josiah Royce's thoughts on poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. As a great man of the age of Revolution, and as a most characteristic man, Shelley is a form of life that must not be left out of sight in any effort to survey the most important tendencies in modern thought and feeling. As undeveloped as he was many-sided and unfortunate, Shelley is an image of the modern spirit itself—ardent, keen-sighted, aspiring, striving to be tolerant, yet often angry with misunderstanding; studious of the past, yet determined to create something new; anxious for practical reforms, yet conscious how weary the work of reform must be. In studying the relation of Shelley to the Revolution, one studies him not in his most peculiar and most individual aspect, but in that aspect of his nature which means the most for the world at large.

Keywords:   Percy Bysshe Shelley, poets, French Revolution, modern thought, Josiah Royce

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