Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Ethics of AuthorshipCommunication, Seduction, and Death in Hegel and Kierkegaard$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Daniel Berthold

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780823233946

Published to Fordham Scholarship Online: March 2011

DOI: 10.5422/fso/9780823233946.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FORDHAM SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Fordham University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FSO for personal use (for details see http://www.fordham.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2017

2. Live or Tell

2. Live or Tell

Chapter:
(p.39) 2. Live or Tell
Source:
The Ethics of Authorship
Author(s):

Daniel Berthold

Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:10.5422/fso/9780823233946.003.0003

The contrast between action and thinking entails a fundamental question about the ethics of authorship: How is one to use words, to write, in such a way as to act—and to elicit action from one's reader? This chapter suggests that a readjustment of the alignment of the kaleidoscope lenses that display the image of Kierkegaard' relation to Hegel allows for a more rewarding dialogue between the two. In the altered image, there is as much telling as living in Kierkegaard as in Hegel, and as much a choice for living in Hegel as in Kierkegaard. Perhaps most important, this reorientation invites us to see the either/or construction of “living or telling” as a false dilemma. As Roquentin discovers as Nausea reaches its enigmatic denouement, it is worth committing oneself to the idea that there is a way of writing in which existence becomes meaningful.

Keywords:   Søren Kierkegaard, G. W. F. Hegel, action, thinking, authorship, ethics

Fordham Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .